Home \ Forums \ Detoxification \ Problems With Rapid Opiate Detox

89 replies, 65 commenters Last updated by Profile photo of Renata Renata 2 months, 2 weeks ago
  • Profile photo of joe smithjoe smith
    Member
    @joesmith_1
    #15753

    rapid detox is the most expensive, horrible detox experience ive ever had. Ive quit cold turkey and had less problems. Listen, when any doctor (who has a vested interest) tells you anything about any detox experience, DONT LISTEN. The only people who can tell you from a realistic expereince standpoint are people who have actually experienced it, not read or written about it in books. I have been an addict for over 30 years. Ive had up to 7 years clean beofore, and have kicked about every drug there is thru about every possible venue. The medical community is filled with people who understand the chemistry of detox but they can only relay what they have read, and it is often inaccurate. I was told that detoxing from suboxone would be like a bad flu from a doctor, turns out-it was one of the worst kicks i ever went thru. Rapid detox is a misnomer, its extremely painful. Detoxing is the drug leaving your system, but thats just the start. The brains chemistry has become dependent on the drug and has ceased many normal functions, the hypothalamus is practically asleep. So once the drugs leave your body, the brain and body take a while to start operating at a normal level, if they even ever return to operating normally. This period is as difficult as the actual ‘detox’ when the drug is leaving your system. So every detox is extremely difficult and painful, and every detox is followed by a chronic state of pain after the acute pain of detox. Do not listen to any Doctor who promises anything else. Good Luck, and remember it does not matter how many times you fall down, what matters is how many times you get up.
    :)

  • Profile photo of joe smithjoe smith
    Member
    @joesmith_1
    #15752

    rapid detox is the most expensive, horrible detox experience ive ever had. Ive quit cold turkey and had less problems. Listen, when any doctor (who has a vested interest) tells you anything about any detox experience, DONT LISTEN. The only people who can tell you from a realistic expereince standpoint are people who have actually experienced it, not read or written about it in books. I have been an addict for over 30 years. Ive had up to 7 years clean beofore, and have kicked about every drug there is thru about every possible venue. The medical community is filled with people who understand the chemistry of detox but they can only relay what they have read, and it is often inaccurate. I was told that detoxing from suboxone would be like a bad flu from a doctor, turns out-it was one of the worst kicks i ever went thru. Rapid detox is a misnomer, its extremely painful. Detoxing is the drug leaving your system, but thats just the start. The brains chemistry has become dependent on the drug and has ceased many normal functions, the hypothalamus is practically asleep. So once the drugs leave your body, the brain and body take a while to start operating at a normal level, if they even ever return to operating normally. This period is as difficult as the actual ‘detox’ when the drug is leaving your system. So every detox is extremely difficult and painful, and every detox is followed by a chronic state of pain after the acute pain of detox. Do not listen to any Doctor who promises anything else. Good Luck, and remember it does not matter how many times you fall down, what matters is how many times you get up.
    :)

  • Profile photo of Anonymous UserAnonymous User
    Member
    @anonymoususer
    #15751

    I have recently (9-28-09) undergone Rapid Detox.
    I agree there is no silver bullet. And they don’t really explain how invasive it is. But, without it I would never been able to get clean on my own. After almost 30 days clean I still don’t feel 100% but then I’m not sure what 100% is anymore. I have to learn things over again.
    You’re fear tactics are BS. I have done massive amounts of research and if people were dying from Rapid Detox I seriously think they would be shut down. Anytime you undergo anesthesia you run risks.
    I just want to say to anyone thinking about taking the Rapid Detox route should do it. But, don’t expect to be bouncing around within days.
    I have worked out all my life even while on opiates. I feel like I am starting from zero. I am still very weak but each day I push myself and I understand patience is the most important lesson. You may have been on opiates for years so don’t expect to feel normal for some time. Start walking, start going to NA meetings or some sort of therapy. Surround yourself with support and realize it’s one day at a time and it will all come back and you will appreciate life more than you ever have before. But, always remember how hard this is and what you felt like, always worried about running out of drugs and the horror of withdrawals. It will not be an easy road. But, if it were easy then we wouldn’t take this as seriously and we’d cave into the psychological craving to use drugs again. Rapid Detox was expensive but, it saved my life.

  • Profile photo of Anonymous UserAnonymous User
    Member
    @anonymoususer
    #15750

    I did go through this so called rapid detox and relapsed immediately, the reason was not the cravings for opiates it was the severe depression I experienced afterwords, I got to the point where I was suicidal after a few weeks after the detox. It could have been from all the drugs they give afterwords I don’t know. I was told from a drug counselor I was not a good candidate after the fact because I had been addicted for almost a decade and this rd only works on people on drugs only for a short time maybe several months or for very young people who’s bodys are strong enough to handle the extreme and I mean extreme trauma of the procedure. I felt like I was near death after the procedure and had never felt so weak and sick in my life I still had the runs for weeks afterwords and I had followed what they had told me to do before the procedure to the T. They then tell you, “you are able to fly home after a few days” ha! I had to be wheeled to the gate from the car and suffer a flight home with the runs! All in all the best way to detox is in a traditional treatment center where the body comes off of opiates slowly and with medication, also you are surrounded with people that will help you & you are never alone which helps with the depression that comes with detox..Many times the amount you spend with rd is the same as a 30 day rahab where you get constant counseling and to boot room and board all included. The people who run these rd places should be ashamed of themselves for stealing money from hopeful addicts, and by the way I went to a 30 day rehab and didn’t have the severe depression, memory loss and trauma over the whole thing..God bless us addicts.

    • Profile photo of Anonymous UserAnonymous User
      Member
      @anonymoususer
      #15748

      The only thing rapid detox does is eliminate the week of pure hell on earth, and for this reason it’s worth it. But then everyone is on an equal level. I waited days, then weeks, then months to feel better, but relapsed after about six months. I thought to myself that it has been six months and I am still feeling like shit so what gives? Perhaps if I stuck with it longer than six months I could have made it. Does anybody else have any thoughts about the length of time required to feel truly normal? Is it 8 months or year? Thanks and I wish all the best. How did I get into this mess? I know one thing for sure…..there’s no damn way I can do it just cold turkey. I think I would hang myself first.

    • Profile photo of Anonymous UserAnonymous User
      Member
      @anonymoususer
      #15744

      To the User that posted about going through pure hell for six months and wondering if he/she didn’t stick it out long enough and wanting to know how much longer it would have taken to feel somewhat normal again, I’m sorry to have to give you such discouraging advice, But it doesn’t matter that you “only” waited six months (which for anyone who doesn’t know the true unbearable suffering of a real serious opiate addiction six months seems like an eternity) You could have waited a year but the sad truth is it simply does not stop ever. At least that is my experience and the experience of others I know who suffer the same fate. I am desperately trying to find a way to pay for the rapid detox treatment. Which I fear is just too expensive now and there is no way i could afford to do it. But I have been off opiates for years and have tried just about everything. I am currently on Subutex, but after years of being on it sadly it no longer works for me. (and this is without relapsing) It initially worked rather well for me but as time has gone by it has slowly started becoming less and less effective to the point where it no longer works at all. I have come to the realization that us opiate addicts that aren’t wealthy enough to afford the rapid detox procedure are doomed to pay for our mistakes of abusing opiates for the rest of our lives. Don’t get me wrong there are some addicts who can go a week or two without using and for whatever reaon no longer get sick. But for the others like myself and any other poor souls where that is not the case, the suffering doesn’t end. It may lessen in severity after long periods of time. But I have only one real regret, and that is ever getting in a car wreck and letting the doctors pump me full of opiates for two years only to cut me off without warning one day and refused to “ween” me off the strong opiates. And for being to weak to go through the initial withdrawl (which I assume wouldn’t have been any wheres close in severity) And using opiates on the streets afterwards to avoid the pains of withdrawl. Because I have been paying for it for many years with no end to the suffering in sight.

    • Profile photo of GuestGuest
      Member
      @guest_1
      #15732

      Very close to home on this…

  • Profile photo of Anonymous UserAnonymous User
    Member
    @anonymoususer
    #15749

    First of all, your introduction on pointing fingers about the authors spelling and grammar immediatley showed me (and im sure other readers) that your real arguement about about the author’s point is weak. People who lack the ability to argue always lower themselves to straying from the debate by “making fun” of the other person. Secondly re-read your statement and you’ll see your grammar skills are also lacking, so please practice what you preach, or keep your mouth shut. Thirdly, the real scammers are the Rapid Detox doctor’s, not the pain management doctors who prescribe necessary pain medication for those who seek it due to life long chronic pain. These Rapid Detox Doctors scam by claiming they have the “cure” for addiction, and they can “cure” addicts pain free. Sadly, those who are terrified of 3-5 days of hell, cough up the 15k-25k dollars and spend up to 2 days in a room, where their bodies will go through a very traumatic experience. The 15k-25k does not go towards the lifelong prescription of naloxene, SSRI’s, and xanax. The doctors also require you to see a therapist (one that they are contracted with) and you will also be paying that seperatley. Your brain will also require nearly 10 times the amount of a normal detox, to re-create the award pathways, which drug addicts destroyed with drugs. During a normal detox, your brain will begin to create these pathways again 24-hours after your final dose, and depending on how bad the addiction is could take up to 3-7 days. These pathways are where your endorphins, dopamine, and lets just say all the happy chemicals your brain naturally makes, travel on. Before these pathways are re-created, you suffer withdrawals. Rapid Detox is meant to flush all the opiates (or whatever the addict was taking) within a very small amount of time. It is not meant for actually healing you, like they specualte by claiming they have the addicts “cure”. By shoving you full of naloxene, your body replaces the endorphins your body needs, with a opiate blocker. This naloxene fits perfectly in your endorphin receptors so your brain believes it has no need to make the endorphins. Now that your brain is tricked to thinking everything is fine, it doesn’t feel the need to repair. Your brain may be fooled, but your body feels no affect from the naloxene, and you become depressed, and anxious. The reason why this is, is because naloxene offers no reward, it is just a blocker. Naloxene is there to keep people from relapsing as soon as they go home. Opiates no longer work while on this medication, so your addiction stops. Too bad you will now suffer until your brain actually heals itself. Over time it will realize naloxene is a problem, and it will begin to close off the new award receptors the addicts brain had create (this is the cause of tolerance) and will begin to create new ones on new award pathways so your brain can start making its own endorphins again.
    To sum this up, the rapid detox doctors are very good at swindling scared addicts to give up 15k-25k. Granted most addicts aren’t smart (I understand some addicts may have become addicted from a terrible injury and thus why i said MOST ADDICTS, and not all addicts) and are easily pressured into believing anything a man with a PH.D. and a white lab coat have to say about skipping the withdrawal stage. In reality, there is a price to pay for everything you do. Whether you waste a nice chunk of money and suffer from depression, and anxiety (by the way withdrawal from anti-depression and anti-anxiety medication’s make opiate withdrawals seem like heaven, and in nearly 35% of withdrawal from anti-anxiety medications have been fatal) for up to 2 years, or you suffer the worst 3-5 days of your life, and allow your brain to heal at the speed it requires. By the way your therpaist wont let you stay on the anti-depressants and anti-anxiety medications for a long time. Since you are now labeled as an addict, they can and will stop you abruptly, when they believe you shouldnt be depressed or anxious anymore. Then you will go through those withdrawals which can last up to 3 weeks of hell. It’s your choice, but delaying the inevitable only makes the price you pay more steep. Save that 15k-25k and join a gym, go back to college, or for those that would need to make a payment plan for that amount, good news is you wont need to worry about that huge bill.

    • Profile photo of Anonymous UserAnonymous User
      Member
      @anonymoususer
      #15743

      I couldn’t even read the rest of what you wrote after that shameful remark… Indeed addicts are usually very intuitive people. Why do you think some are so good at being addicts. Most addicts that get clean go on to have good lives because they are talented and intelligent people. If you are smart in this society, it fucks with your head.. And just because ppl. make mistakes out of ignorance, that is no reason for the application of the word “stupid.”

      I’m 28 and got addicted when I was in my late teens. Pretty much right before the big oxycontin explosion(it being on the news, ppl. Oding, etc.) I did percocet and methadone. And that is what got me hooked. The availability of these pills and the fact that I always worked and had a car made it easy to supply my habit. Had I known that using this “magical” pill that made me feel wonderful would eventually be detrimental to my life and almost impossible to get off of, well then, dumbass, I would have never touched the shit. I guess, now-a-days you’d have to be stupid to not know about these things. But I was addicted with the first pill I so ignorantly took. I had no clue what O.C. or even opiates were. I had no clue I was doing synthetic heroin to put it simply. And some parents shield their kids from it so much that if they do get the chance to try, they really don’t know what they’re getting into.

      taurus050183@hotmail.com

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